Official Reports

More information about Bolivia is available from the Department of State and other sources, some of which are listed below:

  • Bolivia 2018 Trafficking in Persons Report - Released 6-28-2018 (PDF 76 KB)

    BOLIVIA: Tier 3

    The Government of Bolivia does not fully meet the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking and did not demonstrate overall increasing efforts to do so compared to the previous reporting period. Although Bolivia meets the criteria for Tier 2 Watch List, because it has been on Tier 2 Watch List for four consecutive years, it is no longer eligible for that ranking and was therefore downgraded to Tier 3. Despite the lack of significant efforts, the government took some steps to address trafficking, including expanding public awareness campaigns at the national and sub-national levels, opening a shelter for female victims of violence in Santa Cruz, and starting to implement binational agreements to combat human trafficking, such as by creating monitoring stations on the Chilean border…
    (To read the full report, click on the above link)

  • Bolivia 2017 International Religious Freedom Report - Released 5-29-2018 (PDF 98 KB)

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    The constitution stipulates the state is independent of religion and provides for “freedom of thought, spirituality, religion, and cult, expressed individually or collectively, in public and in private.” The constitution and other laws give educational institutions the right to teach religion, including indigenous spiritual belief classes. In September the minister of foreign affairs inaugurated a new office to expedite the process for religious and spiritual organizations to register their legal status, amendment of statutes, internal regulations, and structure of their respective administrative bodies with the government…
    (To read the full report, click on the above link)

  • Bolivia 2017 Human Rights Report (PDF 211 KB)

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    Bolivia is a constitutional, multiparty republic with an elected president and a bicameral legislature. In 2014, in a process deemed free but whose fairness was questioned by international observers, citizens re-elected President Evo Morales Ayma, leader of the Movement Toward Socialism Party (MAS), for a third term. In 2016 the government held a referendum to allow the president to seek a fourth term in office. Citizens voted the measure down in a process that international observers deemed mostly fair and free.
    Civilian authorities maintained effective control over the security forces… (To read the full report, click on the above link)

  • BOLIVIA 2016 INTERNATIONAL RELIGIOUS FREEDOM REPORT (PDF 60KB)

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    The constitution stipulates the state is independent of all religion and provides for “freedom of thought, spirituality, religion and cult, expressed individually or collectively, in public and in private.” The constitution and other laws give educational institutions the right to teach religion, including indigenous spiritual belief classes. Some religious organizations, led predominantly by evangelical Christian groups, expressed concern that the country’s law requiring religious registration could threaten their ability to operate independently and could favor particular religious groups.

  • Human Rights Country Report 2016 (PDF 468 KB)

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    Bolivia is a constitutional, multiparty republic with an elected president and a bicameral legislature. In October 2014, in a process deemed free but whose fairness was questioned by international observers, citizens re-elected President Evo Morales Ayma, leader of the Movement Toward Socialism Party (MAS), for a third term. On February 21, the government held a referendum to allow the president a fourth term in office. Citizens voted the measure down in a process that international observers deemed mostly fair and free.

  • International Narcotics Control Strategy Report 2016 (PDF 383 KB)

    INTRODUCTION

    According to coca cultivation estimates from both the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the Government of Bolivia, Bolivia is the third largest producer of cocaine in the world and continues to be a significant transit zone for Peruvian cocaine. The United States government estimates coca cultivation increased in Bolivia to 35,000 ha in 2014, a 30 percent increase since 2013. Most Bolivian cocaine is exported to other Latin American countries, especially Brazil, for domestic consumption or for onward transit to West Africa and Europe, rather than to the United States. During 2015, Bolivia signed counternarcotic cooperation agreements with Peru and Paraguay. It previously negotiated agreements with Argentina (2000) and Brazil (1978). The Government of Bolivia and the Government of Chile also maintain bilateral cooperation on counternarcotics, despite their ongoing dispute over Bolivia’s access to the sea.

  • International Religious Freedom Report 2015 (PDF 212 KB)

    Executive Summary

    The constitution stipulates the state is independent of all religion and provides for “freedom of thought, spirituality, religion and cult, expressed individually or collectively, in public and in private.” The constitution and other laws give educational institutions the right to teach religion and indigenous spiritual belief classes. Some religious organizations, led predominantly by evangelical Christian denominations, expressed concern that a law proscribing religious registration requirements could threaten their ability to operate independently and could favor particular religious groups. The petition they submitted to the constitutional court demanding a ruling on the constitutionality of the law remained pending. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) suspended implementation of the registration legislation until the court rules.

  • Trafficking in Persons Report 2016 (PDF 4 MB)

    BOLIVIA: Tier 2 Watch List

    Bolivia is principally a source country for men, women, and children exploited in sex trafficking and forced labor within the country and abroad. To a more limited extent, women from neighboring countries, including Brazil, Colombia, and Paraguay, have been found in sex trafficking in Bolivia. Civil society and media report Bolivia serves as a transit and destination country for migrants from Africa, Chile, and the Caribbean, some of whom become victims of forced labor and sex trafficking.